ENDER’S GAME (2013)

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Director: Gavin Hood

MPAA Rating: PG-13

Running Time: 114 min

Ender Wiggins was born to be a commander.  After his brilliant but sadistic older brother, Peter, was deemed too brutal, and his compassionate older sister, Valentine, deemed two mild, his parents were given special permission to have a third child.  And when Colonel Graff witnesses Ender thoroughly defeat a group of bullies, he knows that this boy is the one to lead the Earth’s forces to victory against the vicious aliens that attacked Earth a century earlier–the buggers.  Graff whisks Ender off to an outer space battle school where he is isolated and miserable.  But as he gradually learns how to beat the games the teachers throw at them, he quickly advances from launchy to soldier to commander, and earns the trust of many of his peers–and the hatred of others.

This film captures the important basics of the incredibly nuanced and complex novel of the same name.  I agree with the decision to condense the timeline from the book’s five years to only a year or two.  This allowed them to have one actor play Ender through the whole film and to create a story arc that could easily be followed in a two hour film.  But this meant seeing less of Ender’s transformation over time (they hit the highlights) and far fewer characters (a good choice–easier to keep track of).  The military strategy was also simplified and Peter and Valentine’s political personas eliminated entirely.   Despite these simplifications, the major themes of the book still came through strongly.  The visualization of battle school was very accurate and cool to see (I reread the book to see the descriptions again).  And it was an exciting and suspenseful film that you would be able to follow even if you had not read the book.

In short, a good film and very well done adaptation of the story of Ender’s Game, but not a substitute for the nuanced and thought-provoking novel.

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