J Humor

THE DIARY OF A WIMPY KID by Jeff Kinney

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Greg’s parents always have brilliant ideas about how to make him a better person.  Like his dad making him play outside instead (forcing him to sneak over to Rowley’s house in order to play his video games!) and like his mom buying him this diary (it even says diary on the front of it).  But don’t worry.  He’s not going to get all mushy gushy and talk about his feelings or anything like that.  He’s just going to tell you what it’s like to be in sixth grade, dodging bullies and boredom and trying very hard to move up on the popularity scale.  Or at least, not to move down. . . .

The Wimpy Kid books are favorites among upper elementary schoolers (as well as certain librarians . . . ) and book six will be coming out this fall!

If you liked Diary of a Wimpy Kid, you may also be interested in How to Train Your Dragon by Cressida CowellThe Strange Case of Origami Yoda by Tom Angleberger, and the Big Nate books by Lincoln Peirce.

THE STRANGE CASE OF ORIGAMI YODA by Tom Angleberger

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This book is a casefile compiled by sixth grader, Tommy, as he struggles to figure out the truth:  does Origami Yoda have magical powers?  Dwight, who created Origami Yoda and wears him on his finger, is the weirdest kid in school, and it seems like he never does anything right.  So how is it possible that when Dwight is speaking as Origami Yoda, he gives the best possible advice and even sees into the future?  It is vitally important to determine whether or not Origami Yoda is really magic or just a hoax, because Tommy needs to decide whether to take Origami Yoda’s latest advice in a matter of life-changing proportion.

This book is incredibly funny and great for upper elementary and middle school students; it is especially popular among boys.  It includes instructions for creating your own personal Origami Yoda (magic powers not included).

If you liked The Strange Case of Origami Yoda, you might also be interested in How to Train Your Dragon by Cressida CowellDiary of a Wimpy Kid by Jeff Kinney, and the Big Nate books by Lincoln Peirce.

THE TRUE MEANING OF SMEKDAY by Adam Rex

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What is the true meaning of Smekday–the day formerly known as Christmas, the day that the Boovish aliens arrived to colonize Earth, and the day the Boov left one year later?  This is the essay question that Gratuity “Tip” Tucci must answer.  The winning essay will be put in a time capsule that will be opened in 100 years. In her three attempts at writing the essay, Tip gradually reveals the story of the Boov’s arrival and the events that followed.

While trying to reach the human reservation in Florida by car, Tip and her cat, Pig, met up with a Boov criminal, who has taken as his Earth name J.Lo. (a name that he believes is a popular Earth name due to its frequent appearance in media publications).  Together they travel across the country searching for Tip’s mom, who was abducted toward the beginning of the invasion. Then Tip, J.Lo, and Pig join forces with a gang of boys who have been hiding in a secret tunnel system under Disney World, and together, they drive the Gorg (another set of invading aliens–much more evil than the Boov) out of Earth.  Throughout her story, Tip includes illustrations and pages of comics drawn by J.Lo who can’t write in English.

This book is both hilarious and poignant, a nice blend of hard- and soft-science fiction, approaching issues of race and prejudice through the blunt, sarcastic, witty voice of 11 yr. old Tip.  The book is written for an upper elementary/middle school reading level.  It is one of my all-time favorites.