SHADOW DIVERS: THE TRUE ADVENTURE OF TWO AMERICANS WHO RISKED EVERYTHING TO SOLVE ONE OF THE LAST MYSTERIES OF WORLD WAR II by Robert Kurson

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The world of commercial diving is competitive.  The minute a shipwreck’s location is leaked, dive teams will sprint to it, hoping to get their hands on some of its fascinating artifacts.  The divers that received the secret coordinates to “something big” lying sixty miles off the coast of New Jersey (and 230 feet below the ocean’s surface) were excited to explore an untouched wreck.  But they were not prepared for what they found: a sunken German U-Boat, undocumented in any historical record.  The divers were elated with the discovery–especially John Chatterton and Richie Kohler, two experienced and adventurous divers who also shared a passion for history.  Each diver hoped to be the one to discover the U-Boat’s identity and its story.  But diving to 230 feet is perilous, and it wasn’t long before the wreck began to claim lives.  As most of the surviving divers gradually gave up on the dangerous wreck, only Chatterton and Kohler remained, determined to discover the U-Boat’s identity–even at the risk of their own lives.

I could not put this book down!  Before I began reading Shadow Divers, I knew nothing about commercial diving.  The logistics and dangers of deep sea dives are fascinating, as are the stories of the people who engage in such a life-threatening activity.  Between the danger and suspense of each dive and the intriguing mystery of the U-Boat, I couldn’t turn the pages fast enough!  I highly recommend this book to anyone who is interested in history, who likes survival stories, or even who enjoys reading thrillers.  It is wonderful–a new favorite!

Thanks for the recommendation, Sally!

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